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Aerospace and Defense

Helicopter’s Roof Top Crash Landing Was Likely Done To Save People On The Ground

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Timothy McCormack who was solo-flying a helicopter in New York crashed Monday on the rooftop of a 51 story building at 787 Seventh Avenue in New York City. The crash and deadly fire killed McCormack and destroyed the helicopter in its entirety.

Paul Dudley, manager of Linden Airport where the helicopter was based stated, “I think he tried to land on the building to save the people on the ground, because if he went to the ground it would have been carnage.”

McCormack was no stranger to flying helicopters and had over 15 years of experience, he received his commercial pilot certificate in 2004.

“He is a highly experienced, highly trained commercial helicopter pilot,” Dudley said. “He’s been flying around the New York area and different places for many, many years.”

The crash and the minutes leading up to the crash are still a mystery and an investigation is underway.

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Aerospace and Defense

Airbus Faces Cabin Comfort Dilemma On Its New A321XLR Jet

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Airbus (OTCMKTS: EADSF) has broken the record by laughing the longest-range-narrow-body jetliner at the Paris Airshow which started on June 17, 2019 and goes through June 23, 2019. Narrow body jets are planes with one aisle down the middle splitting seating to each side of the plane and are most often found on short to medium range routes, such as domestic flights in the US, intraeuropean destinations and other short to medium range flights.

However, as technology improves and fuel efficiency gets better and better, these narrow-body jets are now able to fly further and further, which spells trouble for passengers who are already crammed in tight quarters.

The new A321XLR (extra longe range) has a range of 4,700 nautical miles, placing it in the category most often enjoyed by much larger wide-body jets.

This begs the question of whether or not passengers will enjoy flying longer distances in these medium-haul planes, or better yet, at what price.

The smaller, single aisle narrow body aircraft are more efficient than their larger, twin aisle cousins. At the right price, passengers may forgo creature-comforts that are sometimes found on wide-body jets and select a seat on these newer, single aisle aircraft.

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Aerospace and Defense

Delta One Retrofit Coming To Boeing 767-400 Aircraft As Early As November 2019

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Delta has already begun flying its newest Delta One Suites that are installed on the new A350 Aircraft. Passengers can enjoy these suites on select routes on the A350 from Detroit and Atlanta and on certain routes that have retrofitted 777s.

Delta has now announced that the retrofitting of the 767-400 aircraft could happen as early as November 2019, with the potential to be ahead of schedule. While the 767-400 will not receive the same “suite” status, the new retrofit will bring Delta One on the 767-400’s to ‘flagship status’.

Delta believes that the “suite” moniker applies specifically to its seats that contain a closable door – the 767-400 seats, while they will have a privacy divider between seats in the middle and a “wing” divider from the aisle, they will not have a functioning door.  

Seats can be booked using miles, transferred points from credit card programs such as American Express, or with cash, however, flights out of Atlanta on international routes are typically steep, often in the $8,000-$12,000 range depending on purchase date, route demand and more.

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Aerospace and Defense

Boeing Tells FAA About Incorrectly Made Parts On 737 MAX

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More worrisome news comes out about Boeing’s 737 MAX airplane, which was involved in two fatal accidents, both the result of the MCAS systems. However, Boeing has recently notified the FAA with new news about the 737 MAX – some of the parts installed on the plane were improperly manufactured.

A statement released on Sunday from the FAA includes information on two different 737 variants, the 737 MAX and the 737 Next Generation. As many as 148 parts installed on these aircraft were done so incorrectly.

These incorrectly installed parts affect at least 32 Boeing Next Gen air craft and 33 Boeing 737 MAX aircraft, however, the FAA said that a total of 133 Next Generation and 179 MAX could be affected globally.

The 737 MAX is still grounded as Boeing and the FAA work to solve the faulty MCAS system and with more news coming out about issues with the 737 MAX plane, many consumers may still refuse to fly on them.

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